Three girls whispering in ears

Enabling access to healthcare for the underserved

Two out of every three Indians die of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCD) such as diabetes, heart disorder and cancer.

To reduce this burden, the Indian government established NCD cells across the country, where people can receive counseling that supports a lifestyle change. For a program of this magnitude to be truly effective, active participation from private sectors and civil society is essential.

Thus came a Public Private Partnership between Sanofi India and the Government of Maharashtra in 2014.

Group of women, smiling with hands in the air
We extended our expertise in Patient Support Program to train & equip doctors, nurses and counselors at the NCD cells across Maharashtra. Additionally, we created awareness about preventing NCDs amongst the local population through posters and hoardings in State hospitals.
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“I received training on Non-Communicable Diseases - hypertension, diabetes and cancer. The training helped us learn how to help patients control and avoid long-term effects of hypertension, counsel patients on modifying their diet and managing their diabetes, do an early detection of oral and breast cancers, and do further management.”
Dr. Neeta Patil, Medical officer at NCD Department at Women hospital, Jalna
EveryLifeIsPrecious

#EveryLifeIsPrecious

Sanofi’s India Charitable Access Program (INCAP) – part of Sanofi Genzyme’s global humanitarian program – provides free treatment to patients in India afflicted with Rare Diseases like Gaucher, Pompe, Fabry and MPS Type I (aka Lysosomal Storage Disorders) 
 

For patients with Rare diseases, Sanofi is committed to not only develop effective therapies but also ensure that these therapies reach them, regardless of their ability to pay, through our free drug programs. India Charitable Access Program (INCAP) is our free drug program through which we are currently providing free Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) to around 120 patients with any of the four Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSDs) - Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease and MPS I disease. Our Humanitarian program in India began in 1999, even though the commercial operations of Genzyme started only in 2007. The program is guided by an expert medical committee that remains closely involved in participating patients' care and progress.

Sanofi Genzyme, over the years, has worked closely with multiple stakeholders in capacity building in the field of Genetics and Rare Diseases.
Two of the key organizations that we have partnered with are:

SIAMG    CSIR logo